Hawaiian Forests: An Endangered Life-support System

by Michele McKay

Hawaii’s native forests are a true biological and cultural treasure. They shelter more than 10,000 plants and animals found nowhere else on Earth; they protect watersheds, beaches and reefs from devastating run-off and sediment; they foster the survival of traditional Hawaiian cultural practices. But perhaps most importantly, Hawaiian forests serve as a life-support system for our islands, replenishing and delivering the fresh, clean water that is so vital to plants, animals, and humans.

It's Green to Go Veggie!

by Michele McKay

What we choose to eat is one of the most significant factors in the personal impact we have on the environment and the fastest path to climate change. A recent study examining the impact of a typical week’s eating showed that plant-based diets are better for the environment than those based on meat.1 A vegan, organic diet had the smallest environmental impact while the single most damaging foodstuff was beef. All non-vegetarian diets require significantly greater amounts of environmental resources such as land and water.

Surfing Eco-Revolution: Ride Green!

by Michele McKay

Surfing is great for health and fitness. But for the environment, Hawaii’s signature sport has two serious downsides: first, surfboards are made of highly toxic materials; second, the sport generates a vast amount of unusable waste, from production scraps to old, broken boards. The good news is that eco-surf innovators on Oahu and in California are changing all that – and they’re leading a green revolution in the surf industry!

Ocean "Dead Zone" Solution: Buy Organic!

by Michele McKay

The basic principle of organic farming is to work with the natural environment, rather than against it, employing Earth-friendly techniques that eliminate the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Organic methods are widely recognized as protecting land, ecosystems, consumers, farm workers, and communities from the hazards of exposure to toxic agricultural chemicals.

Low-Carbon Eating: Good for Your Health, Good for the Planet

by Michael Bond

Food is often overlooked as a component of our carbon footprint, yet what we choose to eat is one of the most significant factors in the personal impact we have on the environment. A recent study examining the impact of a typical week’s eating showed that plant-based diets are better for the environment than those based on meat.1 A vegan, organic diet had the smallest environmental impact while the single most damaging foodstuff was beef. Likewise, all non-vegetarian diets require significantly greater amounts of land and water resources.

Watching Wildlife Responsibly

by Michele McKay

Watching wildlife is a great way for people of all ages to experience nature and learn about the flora, fauna and environment of our Hawaiian Islands. However, wildlife enthusiasts who disturb land and marine animals or who overuse sensitive areas can pose a threat to the long-term health of wildlife, native plants, and habitats.

Summertime Kokua

by Michele McKay

Summer is a great time to enjoy Hawaii’s beautiful mountains, beaches, and surf! Hiking, biking, snorkeling, swimming, wave riding, barbequing… whatever your pleasure, enjoy the outdoors with kokua, in a way that won’t harm people, animals or the environment.

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