The Diet Wars: Starch is Good

In many Asian and South Asian cultures, the health benefits of rice and other staple starches are well established. Lacking this cultural knowledge, many people in Western countries have bought into fad diets that encourage the consumption of high-fat protein from meat and dairy products. These diets discourage people from eating starches and carbohydrates (grains).

The Health Benefits Of a Compassionate Plant-Based Diet

Did you know that eating a plant-based diet can help reduce your health risks and increase your compassion? We’ve talked before about certain health benefits of eating a plant-based diet – particularly the fact that meat is high in saturated fat, which contributes to cancer, high blood pressure and strokes. However, a plant-based diet offers another health benefit that you may not have considered: the relaxing, immunity-boosting effects of compassion.

The Asian Diet: Back to Future

The traditional Asian diet receives a lot of attention in the United States because many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers, are not as prevalent in Asia compared with the Western Hemisphere. Researchers believe that the traditional Asian diet provides protection against many chronic diseases and contributes to long life spans because it is mainly a plant-based diet consisting of locally grown staple grains, starchy roots, legumes, and other vegetables and fruits. Meat is treated as a side dish rather than the main course.

Natural Food Is Best for Your Health

Natural foods, what are they, and why are they good for you? Unfortunately, there are no commonly agreed upon national or international standards that formally define and regulate "natural foods" or "all-natural foods." The natural products industry defines natural foods as foods that contain no hormones, antibiotics, artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives that were not in the original food, and are foods that are minimally processed—either mechanically, chemically, or by temperature.

Your Health and the Environment

What we eat can cause or worsen diet-related illnesses and thus has a significant impact on our quality of life.

Virtually all the major scientific and medical institutions in the world agree that the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, obesity, osteoarthritis and osteoporosis, cancer, and diabetes, among other diseases is linked to a meat-based diet consisting of highly processed foods laden with fats and artificial ingredients. These institutions further agree that the risk is greatly reduced by adopting a healthy low-fat, high-fiber diet.

Why Adopt a Vegetarian Diet?

If you could take a pill that would improve your health, help save the environment, soften your heart and spirit of compassion ...would you do it?. While it is not a magic pill, the simplest and most effective means to achieve this is to adopt a vegetarian diet. There are significant moral, ethical, environmental, health, and humanitarian benefits of adopting a vegetarian lifestyle. The personal health benefits alone are significant, and the benefits of society as a whole shifting towards a vegetarian diet are earth changing.

Better for Your Health

What Will the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act Look Like In Action?

Two weeks ago, with the First Lady looking on, President Obama signed the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids act in a special ceremony at the Harriet Tubman Elementary School in Washington D.C. The passage marked an important victory for Michelle Obama's Let's Move campaign, and President Obama joked that had he not managed to get it passed, he would have been sleeping on the couch. But other than a well-rested President, what effect will this legislation have on the day-to-day life of the nations schoolchildren?

Military Agrees: Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Are Top Priority

Congress is expected to vote today on an important piece of legislation regarding child nutrition. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi recently urged Congress to renew funding for the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, historically known as the Child Nutrition Act. Signed into law in 1966, this landmark bill created a federally subsidized lunch program for low income students.

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