Can You be Heavy and Healthy at the Same Time?

by Tandis Bishop

You may have heard the term “healthy obesity” to describe people who are obese but don’t have medical conditions that often accompany obesity. However, researchers from the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute in Canada found that there is no such thing as healthy obesity.1 They followed over 61,000 people long enough to examine body mass index (BMI) and metabolic status (such as blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol) linked to cardiovascular events and death.

Help Prevent Obesity with Positive Changes

by Tandis Bishop

With a brand new year right around the corner, it’s the perfect opportunity to introduce healthy, positive changes into your life and help reduce your risk for obesity. Eating plant-based foods as often as possible is one of the best things you can do, not only to help prevent obesity, but also for your health and well-being in general. Here are some helpful guidelines to assist you in creating well-balanced, plant-based meals.

Fabulous Foods for a Healthy Heart

by Tracy Ternes

Incorporate these foods into your diet to help reduce your risk of heart disease and promote cardiovascular health. Oatmeal: A steaming bowl of oatmeal is the perfect way to start your day. Oats are rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium, potassium, folate, niacin, calcium, and soluble fiber. For added heart health, top your oatmeal with ground flaxseed and blueberries. For a sweet treat that’s also good for your heart, bake some delicious oatmeal raisin cookies.

The Fight Against Heart Disease: A Plant-based Solution

by By Tandis Bishop RD and updated by Sabra Rebo, RD.

Time and again we see news reports on studies that remind us of the health benefits of a plant-based diet in reversing coronary heart disease (CHD). In 2010, a study was published in the World Health Organization’s weekly journal, the Bulletin of the World Health Organization. According to the study, nearly 400,000 people were expected to die of coronary heart disease in the United States in 2010.

Move Slowly Towards a Healthy Vegetarian Diet: Best New Year’s Resolution

by Tandis Bishop

January is a time of the year when people think about shedding weight and making resolutions to get healthy. However well-meaning, most people who make such resolutions don’t stick with their "new" healthy commitments for very long. For many, it’s too difficult to keep up. Others grow impatient when the results they seek take longer than they want. Unfortunately, becoming truly healthy is not a quick fix. We need to go beyond New Year's resolutions.