Random Acts of Kindness

A few years ago, when I was a high school teacher in Australia, I assigned my homeroom students a task to each come up with a random act of kindness and write it on a small card. On the other side of the card were the words “You’ve been hit with a random act of kindness. Please feel free to pass it on.” The criteria of the acts of kindness were that they should be done anonymously if possible, and they should be generic enough that anyone could achieve them. We then placed all the cards in a box and each of us drew a card randomly.

Grocery Shopping for Conscious but Busy People

The title of this post describes me perfectly. There are only so many hours in the day, and when I'm finished working, I want to get errands done as quickly as possible so I can enjoy my free time. I relish and search for any and all time-saving (or really effort saving) devices out there… if there’s anything that can help automate my life to get things done faster and done well, I'm all over it.

Why I Love to DIY (and why I despise it sometimes)

If you’ve ever checked out Pinterest, you might be familiar with its overwhelming amount of DIY related posts. (If you’re not sure what Pinterest is, check out this great article.) Tons of blogs and articles extol the virtues of making things on your own. A few common reasons why people are interested in DIY projects range from saving money, wanting to know exactly what ingredients are going into your cookies, testing out your grandma’s homemade dry skin cream, or simply doing something fun.

Support a Local Christmas

As you plan your Christmas shopping list, consider making a more conscious effort to purchase local presents. You’ll be giving great gifts and supporting your community. Down to Earth works with over 400 local vendors, including more than 100 local farmers, to bring you as many locally grown foods and products as are available. We believe supporting local businesses helps promote a healthy and sustainable lifestyle in Hawaii. Also, locally made products are just plain amazing because they're made with genuine love and care.

A Day at Oko’a Farm

Getting directions to visit local farmer Ryan Earehart’s Oko’a Farm in Kula, Maui doesn’t include any street names or address numbers but is instead a list of agricultural references: “Drive until you see a tractor on your right. Keep going until you see a monkeypod tree and take a right, you’ll pass a herd of goats on the left soon. Keep going until you see a pineapple field on the left and you see sugarcane on the right.” If you couldn’t tell by his directions, Ryan is pretty preoccupied with farming and a quick glance around his 4-acre property shows you that his focus is paying off.

Local Chefs Teach Cooking Classes at Down to Earth

We are pleased to announce an exciting new series of paid cooking classes that will be taught by local chefs in our beautiful Kapolei Community Kitchen. Each month we will invite a guest chef to share delicious plant-based recipes. This month, we are delighted to welcome chef Fortuna Arai to our Kapolei Community Kitchen on June 30th from 6:30pm-8pm.


Make a Difference this Earth Day!

Although Earth Day is officially April 22nd, Down to Earth will be celebrating it on Sunday April 27th with a special day of fun and music. Proceeds from tickets sold will go towards supporting an awesome new sustainability charter school in Kaimuki, the School for Examining Essential Questions of Sustainability (SEEQS). Here's a great opportunity to support a worthwhile cause and have fun doing it! Learn more about Down to Earth's Earth Day Celebration

Kanu Hawaii Announces Eat Local Week

Mark your calendars; Saturday, September 25th through October 2nd is Eat Local Week! Kanu Hawaii is organizing a grassroots effort to educate the community about the benefits of eating locally grown food. Kanu Hawaii was started by a group of forty young people who wanted to make change in their communities. It now has over 12,000 members on the islands who commit "to protect and promote island living - a connection to the 'aina, a culture of aloha, and local economic self reliance."